Posts Tagged ‘young adult’

Sales Update: On release day yesterday, I sold three copies of “Waiting for the Baby.” I still have not spent any money on marketing and tentatively am not going to until I have sold at least 80 copies. Since we spent around $40 producing the book (see details in Part One here), I would like to make that money back before I start considering any paid marketing for “Waiting for the Baby.” Releasing a short story did not increase my sales average on The Anorexic Experiment yesterday. Since my reports for Illegally Innocent are through a different self-publishing company and do not get updated as frequently as my published works on KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing), I don’t know yet if it impacted Illegally Innocent sales.

In Part One of this series, I said I would share information about what “publishing” includes. Some of the details you will encounter if you choose to publish a short story (or any kind of book) through KDP are the following:

*Book description–You are writing the “back cover” of your book, even if your book is only an ebook and does not have a back cover. You are trying to write a teaser/summary to draw the reader in. With both of my self-published novels, my description was longer than what I wrote for my short story’s description. With a short story, the material is already so compact that I figured the description should be compact as well.

*Genres–KDP will give you a list of genres and sub-genres in which to place your book to help readers find the types of books they enjoy reading. You can pick up to two of these categories. Sometimes you may be thinking of a genre that exists (and you know it exists because you’ve seen other authors’ books in that category), but it is not offered as an option for you to choose. For example, even though my short story is considered to be a “Short Read,” I could not pick “Short Read.” You basically have to wait for Amazon to classify it after some copies have sold. And even when you pick a genre, sometimes it still will not show up on the actual sales page in the genre(s) that you chose. One of the sub-genres I chose was “Siblings” because a big theme in my story is interaction between two siblings. However, even though I chose “Siblings,” it is not currently showing up on my short story’s sales page as of the time of this writing. The three current genres my short story is showing up under are Teen & Young Adult Short Stories; 45-Minute Teen & Young Adult Short Reads; and Short Stories in Teen & Young Adult Literature. So it did get classified as a “Short Read” after all, like I wanted, even though I did not get to select that option. Interestingly enough, although I only sold three copies the first day, my story is ranked as #12 in one of its sub-genres at the moment. Amazon updates ranks each hour. That’s one of the nice things about Kindle Short Reads–since not as many people write Short Reads compared to longer books, it is easier to get to a “bestseller” status in your genre.

*Price–Amazon will suggest a price based on the length and type of book that it is. For “Waiting for the Baby,” a 30-page short story, Amazon suggested a price of $2.69. I opted to mark it as $1.49. Both of my published novels are currently listed at $2.99, so it didn’t make a lot of sense to me to mark this short story, which is roughly one-eighth the size of my novel The Anorexic Experiment, only 30 cents cheaper than my novels. I was originally going to price my short story as 99 cents, but this way I can run a sale from time to time if I so choose and mark it down to 99 cents for the sale. Also, Amazon gives you a choice of a 70% royalty rate or a 35% royalty rate. If you choose the 70% rate, you are not allowed to mark the regular price of the book lower than $2.99. As stated earlier, I wanted to keep my regular price low, so that was one of my contributing factors in choosing the 35% rate. By selling my story for $1.49, I am supposed to receive 52 cents per copy sold.

*DRM–DRM stands for Digital Rights Management. It had been almost three years since I last published anything, so I had to check out a video to refresh me on what DRM entails and whether I wanted to say yes or no to it. Here is a video you may want to watch to help you decide if you want to enable DRM on your story or not: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k8o1lNa-Ko.

I hope this information is at least a little bit helpful as you explore publishing on KDP!

I am so happy to announce that I have finally published a young adult short story on Amazon! The title is “Waiting for the Baby,” and you can find it here.

As stated in my blog post many months ago, I want to share the details of this short story journey to help you figure out if publishing short stories on Amazon might be a worthwhile endeavor for you. Since I just published it this weekend and am declaring today (Monday, April 27) my official release day, I don’t have any sales data for you yet. However, here is the breakdown of time and money spent thus far:

 

*I spent approximately 40 hours writing, revising, formatting, and publishing this story. “Publishing” includes all of the random details you have to fill out on Amazon (like book description, price, etc.); I will give more information about that topic in a later post. I’m not sure how many hours I put into writing each of my two self-published novels, but I can assure you it was A LOT more than 40 hours.

*My husband Mike spent approximately five hours designing the cover. It is far easier to design a cover for a title that is only an eBook than it is to design a paperback cover because you don’t have to create the spine or the back of the book when it’s an eBook.

*We spent approximately $40 on Shutterstock photos for the cover.

*I paid $1.49 to buy a copy of my own story to double-check that everything looked okay once it was published.

*I have not spent any money on marketing yet.

 

I fully intended to publish this short story sooner and announced to my newsletter subscribers in December that the release date would be January 28. As stated in a Facebook post in February, I apologize to all of you that I did not publish this story on time. I have been struggling to get in the habit of a good writing schedule (and to balance that with adequate sleep) since the birth of my baby last summer and have also felt somewhat lacking in creativity since then. I am going to be much more careful in the future when selecting release dates for books.

Big props go to my husband who read an early draft of “Waiting for the Baby” and helped me re-shape the plot because I was having a hard time with it. One of the benefits of releasing the story in January would have been to have a few weeks of sales data from the time period prior to the stay-at-home orders that so many of us are now under due to COVID-19. It will be interesting to see how sales go, considering that more people are at home now and may have time to read but also may be unemployed and not have money to spend on books. I will share my initial sales data in an upcoming post.