Posts Tagged ‘The Anorexic Experiment’

I have been holding off on updating you about sales of my short story because I was hoping to have something more exciting to report. It’s been long enough, though, that I decided I had better go ahead and post, even if it’s boring. It has been approximately five months since I published “Waiting for the Baby,” and the last time I sold copies of it was in April. Initially after publishing my short story, I saw a rise in sales of my novel The Anorexic Experiment, but those sales numbers have since normalized. I have not seen any change in the sales of my novel Illegally Innocent.

As mentioned in a previous post, I am planning to release a second short story to see if that impacts sales of the first one and will share those findings here when I do. So far, though, it definitely appears that novels sell better than short stories (at least for me).

Three-Week Sales Update: I officially released my YA short story, “Waiting for the Baby,” on Monday, April 27, so its first three published weeks ran from April 27-May 17. Since release day, I have sold a total of four copies. I have not paid for any marketing, but I have spent a bit of time on some free marketing techniques. These include:

*Posting about the story on both my personal Facebook page and my business Facebook page

*Posting about the story on my Twitter feed

*Sending out an e-newsletter announcing the story to my email subscribers

*Blogging about the story in this Kindle Short Reads series

*Changing the banner on my business Facebook page to announce the short story (Mike did that for me)

*Updating my author bio on a few different sites to include my short story as one of my listed works

Have the sales of my other works, The Anorexic Experiment and Illegally Innocent, increased since the release of my short story? I have seen a 37% increase in sales in The Anorexic Experiment during April 27-May 17 when compared with the three weeks prior to release day for “Waiting for the Baby” (April 6-26). My sales of Illegally Innocent have not been impacted.

I have started writing a second short story and am curious how sales of the first story might be affected when I release the second one…stay tuned for more updates on this experiment!

Sales Update: On release day yesterday, I sold three copies of “Waiting for the Baby.” I still have not spent any money on marketing and tentatively am not going to until I have sold at least 80 copies. Since we spent around $40 producing the book (see details in Part One here), I would like to make that money back before I start considering any paid marketing for “Waiting for the Baby.” Releasing a short story did not increase my sales average on The Anorexic Experiment yesterday. Since my reports for Illegally Innocent are through a different self-publishing company and do not get updated as frequently as my published works on KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing), I don’t know yet if it impacted Illegally Innocent sales.

In Part One of this series, I said I would share information about what “publishing” includes. Some of the details you will encounter if you choose to publish a short story (or any kind of book) through KDP are the following:

*Book description–You are writing the “back cover” of your book, even if your book is only an ebook and does not have a back cover. You are trying to write a teaser/summary to draw the reader in. With both of my self-published novels, my description was longer than what I wrote for my short story’s description. With a short story, the material is already so compact that I figured the description should be compact as well.

*Genres–KDP will give you a list of genres and sub-genres in which to place your book to help readers find the types of books they enjoy reading. You can pick up to two of these categories. Sometimes you may be thinking of a genre that exists (and you know it exists because you’ve seen other authors’ books in that category), but it is not offered as an option for you to choose. For example, even though my short story is considered to be a “Short Read,” I could not pick “Short Read.” You basically have to wait for Amazon to classify it after some copies have sold. And even when you pick a genre, sometimes it still will not show up on the actual sales page in the genre(s) that you chose. One of the sub-genres I chose was “Siblings” because a big theme in my story is interaction between two siblings. However, even though I chose “Siblings,” it is not currently showing up on my short story’s sales page as of the time of this writing. The three current genres my short story is showing up under are Teen & Young Adult Short Stories; 45-Minute Teen & Young Adult Short Reads; and Short Stories in Teen & Young Adult Literature. So it did get classified as a “Short Read” after all, like I wanted, even though I did not get to select that option. Interestingly enough, although I only sold three copies the first day, my story is ranked as #12 in one of its sub-genres at the moment. Amazon updates ranks each hour. That’s one of the nice things about Kindle Short Reads–since not as many people write Short Reads compared to longer books, it is easier to get to a “bestseller” status in your genre.

*Price–Amazon will suggest a price based on the length and type of book that it is. For “Waiting for the Baby,” a 30-page short story, Amazon suggested a price of $2.69. I opted to mark it as $1.49. Both of my published novels are currently listed at $2.99, so it didn’t make a lot of sense to me to mark this short story, which is roughly one-eighth the size of my novel The Anorexic Experiment, only 30 cents cheaper than my novels. I was originally going to price my short story as 99 cents, but this way I can run a sale from time to time if I so choose and mark it down to 99 cents for the sale. Also, Amazon gives you a choice of a 70% royalty rate or a 35% royalty rate. If you choose the 70% rate, you are not allowed to mark the regular price of the book lower than $2.99. As stated earlier, I wanted to keep my regular price low, so that was one of my contributing factors in choosing the 35% rate. By selling my story for $1.49, I am supposed to receive 52 cents per copy sold.

*DRM–DRM stands for Digital Rights Management. It had been almost three years since I last published anything, so I had to check out a video to refresh me on what DRM entails and whether I wanted to say yes or no to it. Here is a video you may want to watch to help you decide if you want to enable DRM on your story or not: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k8o1lNa-Ko.

I hope this information is at least a little bit helpful as you explore publishing on KDP!

When I wrote Illegally Innocent (my first self-published novel), I did not have a set process for how I completed it or a certain number of drafts I planned to do before publishing. Honestly, I have no idea how many different drafts I wrote for that novel. When I wrote The Anorexic Experiment, I decided I wanted to try something different–basically a formula. Below you’ll see my novel-writing process for The Anorexic Experiment, and it worked so well that I am using the same formula for my current project, the sequel to Illegally Innocent. You can watch the companion video for this post on my YouTube channel here: https://youtu.be/HLEgLyc3wmU. If you have a certain plan you follow for your writing projects, let me know in the comments below!

First Draft—I am not an outliner. I have a general idea of where the book is starting and where it is going to end up, and I have some plot points in mind that I want to touch on along the way. I try not to edit myself much at all in this first draft and mostly write whatever comes to mind. This is sort of a “junk draft.” I do not let anyone read it. Much of it may not even make sense to someone else or be in the order it is going to be in when all is said and done. I will have a word count target in mind and will try to write until I have both reached my target word count and have managed to form some semblance of an ending to the novel.

Second Draft—I start revising. I don’t spend a lot of time on descriptions or fine-tune the plot yet, but I rearrange the plot points into something that makes more sense, fix obvious errors, and in general turn it into something that I am okay with someone close to me reading. My husband, Mike, reads it to give me big-picture feedback.

Third Draft—I use Mike’s feedback to make more edits and now I will spend time on descriptions, fixing dialogue, and doing what needs to be done to make me comfortable with other people reading it. I fix everything I can identify as needing to be fixed. I ask for beta readers and send the manuscript to several people for feedback on things like what parts are confusing, what parts are boring, and any other general edits that they notice.

Fourth Draft—I take the feedback from my beta readers and incorporate much of it into my editing process. The book is basically finished by the time the fourth draft is done.

Fifth Draft—This is where I go over the book with a fine-tooth comb, checking for any grammar errors I may have missed; checking that I have called all of my characters by the correct names (and spelled their names correctly); and if I have used any brand names, I look them up to make sure that I spelled those brand names accurately. I also check for words that I may have repeated too often. One of those words that I tend to use too much is the word “actually.”

Done! Ready to start the formatting and publishing process!

If you follow me on social media or subscribe to my e-newsletter, you may already know this information, but I would like to update my blog followers on what life has been like the past few months. At the end of June 2017, my second book, The Anorexic Experiment, released and I had big plans to spend the next several months on book promotion. I wanted to participate in as many events as possible and spend a lot of time doing online marketing of my new book. The first week of August, my husband Mike and I were excited to find out that we were expecting our first child. Along with the pregnancy came a lot of exhaustion, and many days I didn’t have the energy to do much beyond working at my full-time day job. I only participated in a handful of events and did not end up dedicating nearly as much time to marketing as I had originally thought I would.

At our first prenatal appointment on October 2, we found out that I had experienced a missed miscarriage. A missed miscarriage means that the baby has died, but the mother does not have any symptoms of a miscarriage. The baby did not have a heartbeat, and an ultrasound revealed that the baby was only measuring 10.5 weeks when it should have been measuring 13.5 weeks. We were devastated, and I ended up having surgery on October 13 since my body was not naturally miscarrying on its own. I wanted to take the rest of 2017 to recover both physically and emotionally, and so I decided not to do much of anything with my writing for the remainder of the year. Other than a few social media posts, I did not do anything to promote my books or do any writing on a future project for those last several weeks of 2017.

By the time the first day of 2018 arrived a few weeks ago, I was ready and eager to return to writing. I have been working on the sequel to my first book, Illegally Innocent, and am currently about 25% of the way through writing the first draft. I have slowly eased back into making social media posts and returned to sending out my e-newsletter in January. I am hoping to have some events scheduled soon and will share with you when I do.

My thoughts and prayers are with all of you who have experienced miscarriage.