Posts Tagged ‘editing’

I hope you all had a great Christmas and that your new year is off to a fantastic start! If you’re still deciding which New Year’s resolutions to pick for 2014, you should consider joining me in the following challenge: Write new material for five hours per week this year. It could be fiction or nonfiction, but it does not include the time that you spend editing your work. You are producing NEW MATERIAL during this time. You could break it up into one hour five days per week or do it all in one five-hour chunk or whatever works best for your schedule. In 2013, I spent a lot of time marketing Illegally Innocent and editing the eBook version of it, and although I did work on my next book project from time to time, I feel as though I don’t have much material to show for it. This year, in addition to the time I spend marketing and doing the other things that go along with self-publishing, I want to produce as much new work as possible. It’s so easy to get caught up in writing a page or two and then wanting to go back over it and edit it right away (that’s how it is for me at least–is anyone else this way, too?), but I’m learning more and more that not much actual writing is accomplished this way. Yes, editing is certainly important, but spending time writing is important, too. Get a LOT of your ideas onto paper and then go back and edit them. Once you have completed the first draft of your book, it will be much easier to edit because you’ll be more familiar with the overall layout of the book. You’ll have a better grasp of what’s important to include in the book and what’s not.

Maybe you don’t think you can fit in five hours per week, but what if you modify the challenge to something more manageable for your schedule, like one hour per week (if that’s more than you’re writing now)? Consider it, and let me know if you decide to take on this challenge.  🙂 I’ll share my progress on my writing goal from time to time, and I’d love it if you’d share your progress as well.

If you decide to self-publish a book, keep in mind that having a lot of typos will draw attention to the fact that your book is self-published rather than traditionally published. If you choose not to pay a professional editor to comb through your work, consider trying some of the ideas in this article to improve your writing: http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2013/02/10-proofreading-tips-for-self-publishers-058.html